[Update] Chinese Rocket Debris Falls into the Indian Ocean

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[Update] Chinese Rocket Debris Falls into the Indian Ocean

[Update] Chinese Rocket Debris Falls into the Indian Ocean

According to the Beijing time, the leftover of the Long March 5B, which was China’s rocket falls, got entry into the earth’s atmosphere at 10:24 am. It disintegrated into the open sea area at 72.47 degrees east longitude. On the other side, the north latitude was 2.65 degrees.

In addition to that, the height of the rocket was approximately 108 feet. Including it, the weight of this rocket was more significant than the 20 tones. The debris of China’s most giant rocket, which was out of control, got re-entry in the earth’s atmosphere and had most of their burned portion fall into the Indian Ocean. In addition to it, the location was nearer to the Maldives.

This information was given by the space agency of the country on Sunday. Moreover, the US and European tracking sites had observed the out-of-control fall of the rocket. Along with it, monitoring Space services that utilize US military data also confirmed the re-entry of this rocket. 

[Update] Chinese Rocket Debris Falls into the Indian Ocean
The Long March-5B Y2 rocket, carrying the core module of China’s space station Tianhe, takes off from Wenchang Space Launch Centre in Hainan province, China, on April 29. (REUTERS)

It said that “Everyone else following the LongMarch 5B re-entry can relax. The rocket is down”. In addition to that, it revealed that “@18SPCS confirms that CZ-5B (LongMarch5B) (48275/2021-035B) re-entered atmosphere 9 May at 0214Z and fell into the Indian Ocean north of the Maldives at lat 22.2, long 50.0. That’s all we have on this re-entry; thanks for the wild ride”.

The US Space command also verified the re-entry of China’s rocket in the atmosphere over the Arabian Peninsula. However, the location was unpredictable whether the debris fell into the land or water. Moreover, Jonathan McDowell, a Harvard astrophysicist who found out the tumbling rocket part, mentioned on Twitter, “An ocean reentry was always statistically the most likely. It appears China won its gamble… But it was still reckless”. 

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